Farewell to the Sky Feeder…

Sky Feeder got a new name from a passerby who called it a “sky garden”. She was more on the mark than she realized, as I would swear those dowels took root! Thank goodness for the recent fall rains which definitely softened the soil.  Even so, I had to dig out about 120 of the dowels with a shovel – after all the hard work pounding them into the ground originally they just didn’t want to pull loose easily. The good news is that the design of the piece proved quite stable! Four wet soggy hours spread across Tuesday and Thursday of last week, not including a break to dodge a brief thunderstorm, left a leaf strewn lawn and some small patches of mud. It gave me a sense of great satisfaction to document the deconstruction as ring by ring the pieces came out, and to see the site return to its natural state.

 

Art Hike Part 3: Upper Meadow

Last Sunday, Aaron, Eva and I stopped by the Upper Meadow to revisit the upper meadow and see the sculptures we missed the last time we were there. Seeing art with a 2 years old can be fun, but is dictated by a toddler’s attention span… I’m so glad we made it back! The colorful knit flowers in Suzanne Tidwell’s Meadows Aloft were one of my favorites, and based on time spent actually looking at them, were Eva’s favorite as well. Several have slumped over, which meant Eva could ring the bells in the flower centers. Maybe this was intentional, maybe not, but was a nice art evolution.

Measows Aloft, Suzanne Tidwell Photo: Teresa Stern

Measows Aloft, Suzanne Tidwell
Photo: Teresa Stern

For another work, nature’s evolution impacted the art. The tree that DNA Planta Genetica, by Mary Coss, was installed on fell over. I didn’t see the piece before this transformation, but I really liked it when I did see it. It was almost like an archaeological remnant, an unexpected discovery of something that had been there for years and years.

DNA Planta Genetica, Mary Coss Photo: Teresa Stern

DNA Planta Genetica, Mary Coss
Photo: Teresa Stern

The textured concrete forms of Spriral Set (Kristin Shimick) managed to create a soft organic feeling. The braille engravings in Elements of Life (Lucy Mae Martin) provided another tactile aspect and a reminder that there are many ways to experience the world.

Spiral Set, Kristin Schimik Photo: Teresa Stern

Spiral Set, Kristin Schimik
Photo: Teresa Stern

Elements of Life, Lucy Mae Martin Photo: Teresa Stern

Elements of Life, Lucy Mae Martin
Photo: Teresa Stern

 

 

Art Hike Part 2: Main Meadow

Over the summer I’ve finally managed to see all the other pieces, many more than once, and take a few photos. Aaron and I also had a bit of a photo competition with each other to take some glamour shots of Sky Feeder, so I’ll include our winners from that in this post as well!

The main meadow certainly packed some artistic, and local, punch. Our online tour of the 100% Washington artist crew, starts with Slow Dance, the piece I visited almost as many times as my own, being my neighbor, and one that you see as you drive into the main area of the park. Fred Lisaius’s salvaged silver ladles serve up light and catch the breeze to give this piece its namesake movement. The red tips on the branches are a nice surprise for those who walk up close.

 

A Slow Dance with soft evening light on silver spoons, by Fred Lisalus. Photo: Teresa Stern

A Slow Dance with soft evening light on silver spoons, by Fred Lisalus.
Photo: Teresa Stern

My other neighbor, Tree of Life by Terra Holcomb, is fun to walk underneath. Have you ever walked below a meadow? Now you can!

I enjoyed walking underneath this elevated meadow from Terra Holcomb.  Photo: Teresa Stern

I enjoyed walking underneath this elevated meadow from Terra Holcomb.
Photo: Teresa Stern

I think I’ve shared enough about Sky Feeder elsewhere on this site… but I’ll add here the winners from our photo session.

 

I finally managed to get a good overall view, tricky with so many reflections... Photo: Teresa Stern

I finally managed to get a good overall view, tricky with so many reflections…
Photo: Teresa Stern

Aaron took some great detail shots showing the tree reflections. Photo: Aaron Stern

Aaron took some great detail shots showing the tree reflections.
Photo: Aaron Stern

Closer to the water, in the parking island, Ken Turner’s Projections and Reflections on the Moment catches a bit of sky reflection itself and commands its central spot. The Sound Tree has been a favorite perch of birds who add to the sound effects designed by Savina Mason.

Projections and Reflections on the Moment, by Ken Turner. Photo: Teresa Stern

Projections and Reflections on the Moment, by Ken Turner.
Photo: Teresa Stern

Savina Mason's Sound Tree. Photo: Teresa Stern

Savina Mason’s Sound Tree.
Photo: Teresa Stern

Art Hike Part 1: Lower Meadow

With visits out to Carkeek Park to check on my own piece, I’ve also had time for a quick tour of all the other installations. I had a longer tour of the Lower Meadow works this past Tuesday. It was nice to have more time to peer into, walk around, or linger and listen to other viewers comments. I decided to include a couple favorite, teaser photos, but will leave the rest for your visit…

“Sanctuary”, by Seattle artist Michael Harrison, is made from all sorts of building scraps, glass plates, bottle caps and other salvaged items. Peering in through holes and small windows reveals a montage of nature: branch, moss, horns. I really enjoyed that surprise, does nature need a respite? It certainly needs protection these days. The artist calls us to experience vs tweet. Hopefully experiencing, then blogging counts.

Detail of Sanc-tu-ar-y by Michael Harrison. Photo: Teresa Stern

Detail of Sanc-tu-ar-y by Michael Harrison. Photo: Teresa Stern

I also spent some time marveling at the strange orange cone, which called to mind something out of the 80’s show The Land of the Lost. Turns out, it’s a camera obscura! “Nature Obscura”, by another local artist, Megan Treasure, offers one more twist on reflecting sky and nature. Staring at things upside down or backwards is a way to trick ones brain into seeing things anew, catching something you might have missed otherwise, and was an inspiration for the mirrors on Sky Feeder. I really enjoyed seeing a totally different interpretation.

Detail of Earthly Obscura by Megan Treasure. Photo: Teresa Stern

Detail of Earthly Obscura by Megan Treasure. Photo: Teresa Stern

Chicago 3-D printing artist Joshua Harker created the 8 foot Crania Geodesica from branches found on site. I listened to a pre-teen boy pointing it out to a friend. Art really is for all ages! Tom Hughes’ poetic “Glider” installation was down, maybe a strong wind, or a push; hopefully it will rise again soon.

Other Lower Meadow installations include the winding “Willow Water” piece, which celebrates the drip line of the draping tree above, Allyce Wood’s lacey orange “Periapt” tree amulet, and ghostly “Stalagmites” hailing all the way from Minnesota by artist Elisa Berry Fonseca.

H&E VI Art Map

Ah, completion. It’s such a nice word! It’s such a great feeling to design and develop a project, and see it through to the end. Having friends join in the hard work made it a lot more fun, thanks to all those who came with hammers ready on July 5th! It was a 12-hour marathon install day for Aaron and I; the helping hands meant we could stick to just one long day! After a week of “commissioning”, the glue issue is solved. I’ve been to the site at several times of day, and have enjoyed visiting the other artworks too. I’ll do a separate post on that soon… For now, here’s the map files so you can print them and have your own art walk in the park! I’ll be arranging some guided tours over the summer too, so let me know if you want to join one.

2014 Center on Contemporary Art's Heaven & Earth VI Carkeek Park Art Hike Map

2014 Center on Contemporary Art’s Heaven & Earth VI Carkeek Park Art Hike Map

2014 Center on Contemporary Art's Heaven & Earth VI Artists and Titles Legend

2014 Center on Contemporary Art’s Heaven & Earth VI Artists and Titles Legend

Coming Unglued…

The installation of Sky Feeder is about 98% complete… it’d be 100% if the heat wasn’t causing about 10% of the mirrors to pop right off within three days of initial installation. I’ve got three new attachment options testing in the garage and front yard, so by tomorrow I’ll know which one’s the winner and go back out and replace the 20 or so missing mirrors. Overall I’m very happy with the piece. When you walk around it the light and reflections change and it’s quite magical. Walking up the hill from the east in the soft light of twilight is my favorite viewing experience so far. I’ve also really enjoyed talking with folks who wander by and discover the random art projects throughout the park. Can’t wait until the official Heaven & Earth signs go up on Friday so maybe fewer people will try to walk through the piece or pull dowels out of the ground…

Sky Feeder installation in progress.

Sky Feeder installation in progress.

Ready to Go!

We’re ready! All the pieces are cut and all the mirrored discs are glued. My construction guru Aaron made some nifty plywood templates to speed up the process of laying out all the dowels in the nine rings. We did a layout test in the back yard last weekend with the inner six rings and everything worked very well and pretty close to perfect spacing. That’s a big sigh of relief!

SkyFeederLayoutTest

Now on for final installation planning and the big INSTALL this Saturday July 5th! If you’re around north Seattle, stop by Carkeek and say howdy to our crew! We’ll be there through at least mid afternoon. Most of the other artists will be around working on their pieces also, so it’s a great chance to see art happen. Carkeek’s a BIG park; here’s a map link with the artist locations listed so you can find us.

HE3 Cycles of Return Catalogs

I was digging around past Heaven & Earth exhibits, and found that HE3 catalogs are still available on Lulu. It includes photographs of my Holdfast installation, before it was vandalized. Luckily David Francis found most of it in the bushes, so it was largely saved. Sadly I didn’t get a chance to get some video of the work floating in the water at different tides. I still have it though and have it in mind to do that still, and think of it every summer…. Maybe this year will be the year!

Heaven & Earth III: Cycles of Return Catalog

Heaven & Earth III: Cycles of Return Catalog